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outtasightblog:

Had a day off in Revelstoke, BC yesterday so Nik & I decided to brush up on our snowboarding skills. Many thanks to everyone we crossed paths with for being so kind and helpful —M

outtasightblog:

Had a day off in Revelstoke, BC yesterday so Nik & I decided to brush up on our snowboarding skills. Many thanks to everyone we crossed paths with for being so kind and helpful —M

Photoset

"There’s more to life than a little money, you know. Don’tcha know that? And here ya are, and it’s a beautiful day. Well. I just don’t understand it." - Fargo (1996)

(Source: mashamorevna, via suzybishop)

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tank-commander:

Pacific Underwater: The great grey migration

Every March, thousands of eastern Pacific grey whales repeatedly dive, surface and blow plumes of water vapor during their migration north along North America’s west coast. After wintering in tropical waters off the Baja peninsula, most travel over 10,000 kilometers to summer feeding grounds in the Bering Sea. But some “summer residents” end their migration right here along British Columbia’s coast.
Even though they can grow longer than your average school bus (up to 15 metres), these barnacle-covered leviathans lack a dorsal fin and so can be difficult to spot. Luckily, grey whales enjoy feeding in shallow waters, so they’re frequently seen from shore, identified by their heart-shaped blow. Every March, the Pacific Rim Whale Festival in Tofino and Ucluelet celebrates the greys’ return. Locals and travellers alike embrace the ocean giants’ migration through education, art, food, song and dance
Read more here
Photo by Chrisweger via Flickr

Wrote a piece about the Grey-t migration of these lovely leviathans. It’s happening off the B.C. coast, and all along North America right now. Keep an eye out, a few years ago one meandered almost all the way to Science World downtown Vancouver!

super interesting! kat you rock

tank-commander:

Pacific Underwater: The great grey migration

Every March, thousands of eastern Pacific grey whales repeatedly dive, surface and blow plumes of water vapor during their migration north along North America’s west coast. After wintering in tropical waters off the Baja peninsula, most travel over 10,000 kilometers to summer feeding grounds in the Bering Sea. But some “summer residents” end their migration right here along British Columbia’s coast.

Even though they can grow longer than your average school bus (up to 15 metres), these barnacle-covered leviathans lack a dorsal fin and so can be difficult to spot. Luckily, grey whales enjoy feeding in shallow waters, so they’re frequently seen from shore, identified by their heart-shaped blow. Every March, the Pacific Rim Whale Festival in Tofino and Ucluelet celebrates the greys’ return. Locals and travellers alike embrace the ocean giants’ migration through education, art, food, song and dance

Read more here

Photo by Chrisweger via Flickr

Wrote a piece about the Grey-t migration of these lovely leviathans. It’s happening off the B.C. coast, and all along North America right now. Keep an eye out, a few years ago one meandered almost all the way to Science World downtown Vancouver!

super interesting! kat you rock

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(Source: earlyware, via tank-commander)

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tank-commander:

Wickaninnish Beach

tank-commander:

Wickaninnish Beach

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(Source: brandyalexanders, via mcavoys)

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"Whoa! They’re trippin’ on your flippin’. Keep going, girl!"

(Source: milafranco)

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(Source: officerockparks)

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woodendreams:

(by Lazy Desperados)
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